Just Japan Podcast 5: 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami

In Episode 5 of the Just Japan Podcast, Kevin interviews Jeff Quinlan, a teacher who was living in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan on March 11th, 2011. Jeff was living close to the Fukushima Daichi Nuclear Reactor the day Japan was hit by its biggest earthquake in history and the tsunami that followed. Listen to his amazing story.

Learn more about the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami. 

Subscribe to the Just Japan Podcast on iTunes.

Don’t use iTunes? Download this Just Japan episode here.

LISTEN to the episode using the Libsyn player!

In this episode I talked about Hina Matsuri or the Girl’s Day Festival here in Japan.

Check out the video of the day my daughter’s Hina Ningyo arrived at our house in Japan.

Take a look at some of Jeff’s pictures from the Fukushima area after the earthquake and tsunami struck.

A road near Jeff's home in Yabuki-machi, Fukushima, destroyed by the earthquake, sitting in disrepair even one year later.
A road near Jeff’s home in Yabuki-machi, Fukushima, destroyed by the earthquake, sitting in disrepair even one year later.
Manhole and pipe that were forced out of the ground.
Manhole and pipe that were forced out of the ground.
A collapsed wall of a local shrine in the village Jeff lived in.
A collapsed wall of a local shrine in the village Jeff lived in.
A house destroyed by the earthquake and tsunami.
A house destroyed by the earthquake and tsunami.
A radiation monitor that Jeff describes in the podcast. These things are everywhere around the state... even at my schools. They measure the radiation. Basically anything near 0.800 is cause for concern; anything over 1.00 means you should probably start taking protective measures. My schools are only around 0.140, but here in Koriyama, they are much much higher.
A radiation monitor that Jeff describes in the podcast.
These things are everywhere around the state… even at my schools. They measure the radiation. Basically anything near 0.800 is cause for concern; anything over 1.00 means you should probably start taking protective measures. My schools are only around 0.140, but here in Koriyama, they are much much higher.
Runa's (2nd-grade student) dosimeter lanyard. The elementary students in Fukushima were required to wear these everyday for monitoring their exposure levels after the nuclear disaster.
Runa’s (2nd-grade student) dosimeter lanyard. The elementary students in Fukushima were required to wear these everyday for monitoring their exposure levels after the nuclear disaster.

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Here are some of the charities doing work in the Tohoku area right now. Why not check out their pages and maybe lend a hand?

Save Minamisoma Project

Habitat for Humanity Japan

Japan Red Cross (donate blood)

It’s Not Just Mud

Smile Kids Japan 

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